HR LIFE: 3 WAYS OF NOT ALLOWING GENDER STEREOTYPES IN THE BUSINESS.

TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE? QED GARETH MORGAN

LET’S GO STRAIGHT TO THE POINT

  1. Many organisations are dominated by sexist values which “infect” the organisational life in favour of one sex or the other.
  2. The man-woman relationships are often subjected to stereotypes and prejudiced images on how the two sexes should actually behave.

HERE IS AN EXAMPLE BY MORGAN

scheme from: Images of Organization, G. Morgan, SAGE Publications ed.

WHAT DOES IT REALLY MEAN TO BE INFLUENCED BY STEREOTYPES IN THE ORGANISATION LIFE?

OK, THIS WAS BAD NEWS… GOOD NEWS IS…

3 THINGS TO DO:

  1. Abandon the hierarchical structure for a flat or reticular one instead.
    Many of the organisational structures are still very hierarchical today. This translates into a very scarce communication and collaboration among teams/offices/departments with most of the decisions agreed by the above structure and in an atmosphere of control and command.
    A flat organizational chart represents a network of opportunities for the experience exchange and for people to grow, regardless of their gender. This is the great environment for different managerial styles based on collaboration values, listening, empathy and dialogue to grow. In a network-based world, abilities and new competencies are needed. And the features of the feminine archetype do offer interesting things.
  2. Gradually built consensus
    Sometimes you need some courage to communicate the vision. You need to be blunt to unite forces, energies, resources (even when sometimes they are all contrasting each other) and this can happen with gender diversity. Without identification, without a common passion, it is impossible to feel the force within us that makes us go beyond stereotypes. Inclusion, participation, cooperation, equality and focus on the solution are the most important aspects, not the faults and the culprits. The decisional process which starts consensus needs a discussion that involves everyone. It is not a debate between enemies: all parties then need to be on a common level.
  3. Activate your intuition
    It is important to trust your intuitions to make an inconvenient situation come to an end — a situation such as gender stereotypes. Be very careful with the bias which bewilders intuition. When we have to make a decision and our intuition is telling us: “This person is influenced by typical stereotypes” we need to stop and ponder to understand if our thoughts are biased and in which percentage. We need to look back at our past experiences to understand if they are influencing the way in which we are seeing the person: this is the ultimate key to be successful and not biased.

ACCEPT AND OVERCOME YOUR FEARS

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Interlogica

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We are a company at the crossroad between tech & human evolution. Catch a glimpse of who we are by reading our insights!

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